CALM FAQs


Quick Links

  1. Is CALM for patients or providers?
  2. What is the difference between "CALM" and "CALM tools for Living"?
  3. What is this "tool" that CALM uses?
  4. How can I get access to the Tools for Living and begin using CALM with my patients or clients?
  5. How much does the license for the web-based program cost? What do I get for this license?
  6. What staff are needed to use CALM?
  7. What other resources and equipment are needed to implement CALM?
  8. What is a typical caseload size for a CALM Provider?
  9. Is CALM for use in primary care or a mental health center?

Questions and Answers

  1. Is CALM for patients or providers?

  • CALM is a structured therapeutic approach to reduce anxiety and depression symptoms in patients or clients. It is a specific approach for clinicians/providers to use with patients.
  • CALM Tools for Living is a web-based intervention program that takes patients step-by-step through the intervention, assisted by a provider/clinician.
  • The CALM services, available through the University of Washington Innovation Learning at CoMotion, are for providers/clinicians. We do not treat patients directly, nor do we sell the program or materials to patients.
  • Clinics, agencies, and providers may purchase a yearly license to use the CALM Tools for Living-II web program.

  1. What is the difference between “CALM” and “CALM Tools for Living”?

  • CALM is the structured therapeutic approach that underlies the web-based tool.
  • The CALM Tools for Living is a web-based program that guides patients, with the assistance of a clinician, through the treatment intervention.
  • The web program is available to clinics, agencies and clinicians.
  • To access and use the CALM Tools for Living requires the purchase of a yearly license, with certain restrictions of use.

  1. What is this “tool” that CALM uses?

  • CALM Tools for Living is a web-based program that takes patients through a step-by-step process to learn the knowledge and skills they need to reduce symptoms of anxiety and/or depression.
  • Patients read information on the computer, watch video demonstrations, discuss it with their CALM Provider (clinic staff person), learn various skills (thinking, feeling, behaving), and develop a plan to practice these new skills.
  • The program has various modules that are combined over 8 sessions. Some are the same for all anxiety disorders and depression; others contain sessions that differ in content particular to each disorder. Depending on the disorder being addressed, the program automatically guides the patient through those modules relevant to that disorder.
  • The program saves data entered by each patient for later reference, allowing the clinician and patient to review change that occurs over time.

  1. How can I get access to the Tools for Living and begin using CALM with my patients or clients?

  • A license for the web-based program, CALM Tools for Living, is available here.
  • The license grants permission to use the web-based program for one year, and may be easily renewed.
  • The license includes an electronic copy of a Training Workbook that describes the program, its use, and the modules.
  • Because the program and workbook easily guide clinicians in how to use the intervention, no additional training is required.
  • However, training on the CALM approach to treating anxiety and depression may be arranged through University of Washington Innovation Learning at CoMotion, this general training is clinically useful, whether or not you are using the web-based program.

  1. How much does the license for the web-based program cost? What do I get for this license?

  • The fee to access and use the web-based CALM Tools for Living program is based on the number of users at a single clinic or agency.
1-2 users  $450 per user per year
3-20 users $400 per user per year
21+ users  $300 per user per year
  • The yearly fee includes monitoring and maintenance from a systems perspective. This means ensuring that an agency has access to the program, trouble-shooting IT problems, etc.
  • Additionally, an agency is able to download monthly usage reports of aggregated data such as number of patients enrolled in the program, frequency of use, completion percentages, improvement rates, etc. Of course, clinician- and supervisor-level access is also available to address clinical issues for each patient.
  • NOTE: The license fee does not include any assistance to address clinical issues of patients.

  1. What staff are needed to use CALM?
CALM Provider

  • The clinician/provider who has the role as the CALM Provider does not have to be an expert in anxiety/depression disorders and treatment. The web-based program directs the treatment.
  • No minimum education or training requirements have been established for the CALM Provider role. The research study used masters-level clinicians; but, each agency will have different capabilities and resources.
  • While the web-based program walks the patient and provider through the intervention, having a basic understanding of mental health issues is needed. Therefore, the designated CALM Provider may need an introductory and/or refresher training on anxiety and depression, cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychiatric medications, etc.
Primary Care Provider
  • Involvement of the Primary Care Provider is important since the intervention is often conducted in primary care clinics.
  • The Primary Care Provider should also be involved for medication needs.
Psychiatrist
  • A psychiatrist should be available for consultation by the CALM Provider or the Primary Care Provider.
  • The psychiatrist can also handle more complex psychiatric medication issues.
Clinical Supervisor
  • Clinical supervision of staff having direct patient/client care is always important, to ensure that clinical issues are addressed appropriately.
  • This supervision is handled directly by the agency, not through UW or Innovation Learning.
  • It is helpful that the supervisor understands the CALM program and approach to treatment specifically, as well as having strong clinical/therapeutic skills.
Structural Support
  • Having a data/computer systems person to deal with IT issues and run reports would be beneficial.
  • An agency champion, who promotes use of the program and assists with program integration into the clinic system, will help achieve programmatic success.

  1. What other resources and equipment are needed to implement CALM?

  • A private room equipped with a computer, with Internet access, and printer.
  • Pre-printed copies of certain forms, as described in the intervention.
  • Patient reminders, as needed, for appointments, instructions for accessing the program outside of session, etc.

  1. What is a typical caseload size for a CALM Provider?

  • Probable caseload sizes for a CALM Provider have not been determined.
  • Case size would depend on the percent of time a staff person is dedicating to the CALM Provider role.
  • An estimate for a full-time person could be approximately 30-32 patients per week.

  1. Is CALM for use in primary care or a mental health center?

  • The research study proved CALM’s effectiveness in primary care settings. This is important because primary care is the de facto treatment setting for mental health care.
  • However, CALM and CALM Tools for Living could easily be incorporated into a mental health center as a treatment modality.